from weakness comes strength

From Weakness Comes Strength: Why Weakness Exists

Our story begins with the birth of a seed. Just look at it – it is such a tiny thing that can somehow grow into a massive tree. How does it do it? The tiny seed is packed with enough energy to kick-start the process of growing. But wait a minute, not every seed gets this kick-start. Quite a few of them…um…pass away.

So how is it that the remaining are able to grow?

While the tiny seed is packed with enough energy that can be used for growth, it takes energy to keep the tiny seed alive. For when it loses the energy, it…um…passes away.

This means that the energy contained within the seed is divided into two parts – one that is used for growth, and another to stay alive. This also means that the seed will never be able to apply its complete energy towards the process of growth. There will be a part of it that will constantly work towards keeping it alive.

Does this mean that the energy kept in store to stay alive is holding the plant back from growing? Obviously not. The energy is in fact, aiding the growth of the plant. For the plant can grow only if it is alive.

And humans work the same way…

We can grow only as long as we are alive. A part of our energy goes towards growth and the other part is in store to keeping us in working condition. That is a very physical fact. But how does something like this work mentally?

I get tired very quickly. Whenever I do any activity that requires a lot of legwork, I get legitimately drained. I have tried doing the regular 9 to 5 job and have realized that I couldn’t do anything else since I would be dead tired by the time I got back home. Also, I can never handle the usual household chores at one go. And my exercise is cut off to a very brisk 20-minute walk.

That was also why I was constantly in awe of people who worked tirelessly, wondering why I couldn’t do what they could do.

Why are you weaker while they were strong?

Turns out, I cannot type away these words if I tire myself out.

Also turns out, great writers cannot be great talkers. Because the more time we spend talking, the less time we spend writing. Imagine a world in which Mark Twain spent a whole load of time talking about Tom Sawyer instead of writing about him. The world wouldn’t sound right, would it?

My husband often complains about the fact that I don’t socialize or stay street-smart as a lot of my friends do. I tell him that my friends don’t write as I do. That does the job.

What the rest of the world sees as a weakness, is only an aid for growth. The part of me that does not talk much is also the part of me that keeps me focused on writing, thereby aiding my growth. My essence of being a non-chatter is what keeps me alive.

Are you saying weakness is a myth?

The mass perception of weakness is a myth.

Take the idea that is Dyslexia. The world looks at it as a problem. But is not being able to read out aloud, interpret words, or being able to spell well, really a problem?! Dyslexics are in fact, super-fast readers. They read at a speed that the rest of the world cannot match. Except the reading happens within the mind. And reading in the mind is good enough. So, what if they cannot read out aloud?! Big deal!!!

Dyslexia is never a problem. It is just how the brain functions for that individual. Just like how not every plant grows the same way. And just like how dogs think different from wolves.

The problem with dyslexia has to do with how the world looks at dyslexia because it does not fit into the box of how we “should” work. It becomes bigger when the child is forced to work on overcoming the dyslexia, ignoring his real calling. The problem explodes when the child is repeatedly made to think that he does not fit in. And the problem implodes when the child loses his sense of self-worth. The real problem here is the emotional turmoil caused within the child because of what the world has assumed, is a problem.

In reality, the brain of the child works that way to show him his real way. When the child continues to struggle with reading or interpreting, it is the brain telling – Dude! This way is blocked. Check out another route.

When the child gives up on this route, and does indeed check out another route, is when he achieves real progress. And not when he wastes his time working on overcoming his weakness. For all we know, there could be a rock star or a sports star hiding within the kid, waiting to be found.

What we think is a weakness, is only an aid for progress

Take the case of a self-doubter (I am one). He will always calculate his next move – what works best, and what not. Most self-doubters are also the most people who get their shit right. But the world loves the aura of a confident person. So, the world thinks that confidence is right and self-doubt is wrong, confidence is strength and self-doubt is a weakness. And poof! there goes the self-doubter’s sense self-worth.

So, technically speaking weakness does not exist!!!

Yes! Weakness do exist.

The loss of self-regulation is a weakness. Succumbing to mass perceptions is a weakness. Trying beyond everything to fit ourselves into boxes is a weakness. Wasting time on overcoming what we think is a weakness, is a weakness. Losing our way to the ways of the world is a weakness. Doing the wrong thing, despite being aware of the wrong in it, is a weakness.

Our life is what we make of it, and not what others make of it for us.

Here’s to defeating mass perceptions and figuring out how you work!

Kanika Kumar

Dear You, I am a writer and I specialize in Dark Spaces. As a child I explored the unknown through my reading. Now, as an adult, I traverse the spheres of fiction and non-fiction through my understanding of this unknown space that exists both within and around us. Through all of my lessons in spiritual reasoning, physical well-being, mental connections and emotional awareness; observation and experience have been my greatest teachers. Join me in my travels as we grow together through discovery, acceptance and progression.

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